Saturday, September 13, 2008

Research: Noob Web pages can compete

NewScientistTech reports on a new study: Websites shed light on how humans value fresh ideas:

Web pages that hadn't existed when the year began accounted for just under half of the winners – displacing an equal number of older, more established pages in the process.

This is good, considering how important search is to the discovery of content, logic would tell us that it would be very difficult for new pages to be found at all. The article makes a leap, however, that is not part of the research:

Web pages that hadn't existed when the year began accounted for just under half of the winners – displacing an equal number of older, more established pages in the process. That proportion held even when the bar for success was raised, suggesting there is a general tendency for young websites to out-compete established websites half the time.

Sigh! I get bothered when researchers try to extrapolate their findings to things they didn't study. This study was about Web pages, and not about Web sites. They are not the same thing, not even close.

2 comments:

Bud said...

One thing to keep in mind is that static knowledge goes out of date fairly quickly. Just look at Google search trends to get a picture of that dynamic.

So, I'm not sure if it's new pages competing effectively or old pages becoming irrelevant (this was about pages, right? :)

Kevin Gamble said...

All good points.

Of course it was about pages. Sites don't matter anymore. :)