Saturday, December 15, 2007

Google Knol and copyright

I finally got around to studying up-close the example Knol that Google created for demonstration purposes. Imagine my surprise to see that they had embedded a Creative Commons license on the page. This is looking better...

It's a very interesting page for a number of reasons. It's basically a self-contained Web site. There is no navigation, only links to related content. Even if Knol goes nowhere, which is highly unlikely, this is a model for modern Web content design.

2 comments:

Eli Sagor said...

Your Knol posts and he recent comment about Extension fact sheets make a lot of sense to me.

About destination websites going extinct: We send out a monthly html-formatted email update to drive traffic to our site, www.myminnesotawoods.org. It looks nice and people love it.

The surprise to me is that people think that the email IS the site. Users tell us all the time that they love the site, but stats couldn't be clearer: they don't come to us. If we don't push the content to them, they don't see it. Evidently they have better things to do than click through our site looking for updated content... Shocker.

I expect our site and strategy to evolve away from the destination model toward sort of an index to quality content relevant to our target audience, wherever that content is, delivered to users.
-eli

Kevin said...

Thank you for your comment Eli.

I suspect that syndication and feeds and widgets are emerging models of your push email as well. They accomplish the same thing, and reinforce the concept of the come-to-me Web. (BTW, the person who coined the term "the come-to-me Web" will be one of the keynoters at NETC this year.)

As to "an index to quality content relevant to our target audience, wherever that content is, delivered to users." Isn't that what Google does?