Saturday, January 13, 2007

Learning about yourself from Google Reader's Trends

Jeffrey Veen comments on Google's new application for seeing who/what has got your personal attention:

But beyond the visualization, this serves as a good example of collecting and understanding the ambient information that flows through our digital lives. I've been fascinated by this for a while, but started thinking about it more last year when Tom Coates posted on the topic. As we move through our connected days, the thousands of tiny behaviors can be recorded and analyzed, helping us to better understand who we really are, be it through the music we listen to, the sites we bookmark, or the money we spend.

Other than seeing how many sites I subscribe to, and how many posts I read a day (I average over 30 a day and have had 6 days in the last three weeks where I have read over 70… I had no idea) there was something else that shouted-out at me: the three blogs that I read the most are my work colleagues. These blogs garnered over 90% of my attention. No other blog registered more than 50%. I also find it interesting that these people are in the closest physical proximity to my office. I talk to them every single day, and yet I still read every thing they write. There‘s a lesson here.

If you‘ve been thinking about blogging, and don‘t think you have anything to say, think about your closest colleagues and family (think of your list of eight) and write for them. They really do want to know what‘s got your attention, what‘s important to you, and what you‘re thinking.

If you‘re curious, here are the blogs that I have read the highest percentage of posts over the last 30 days:

The Robinson House
Rambles of a University Systems Manager
rc3.org
apophenia
confused of calcutta
Beth's Blog
socialwrite.com
Infothought
Read/WriteWeb
eContent

There were a few surprises for me on the list. If you‘d asked me to name the blogs I read the most there are several that I wouldn‘t have thought to list.

This is sort of fun. I might do a post on what I‘m reading once a month and see how it changes. If you use Google Reader (and who does not?) you can check your own trends here.

No comments: